WHAT WE DO

Our experience, plantation, water management system, and prospective projects

Our Prospective Projects


Multiple Cropping Project

Multiple cropping is the agricultural practice where two or more crops are grown at the same time or in a sequence/different growing seasons, in the same piece of land. It is considered as a form of polyculture since it uses multiple crops in the same space, providing crop diversity in imitation of the natural ecosystems diversity, and avoiding large stands of single crops (monoculture).

Together with the plantation people, our foundation has actually initiated this project in our project site. An experimental multiple cropping project has been developed around the plantation office area known as the Kilometer 9 (KM9). In this KM9, several crop species such as Hylocereus spp. (dragon fruit/patahaya), Aloe vera, and Allium cepa (red onion), have been planted and studied to have analyze their abilities to survive and be cultivated in the unique types of land

As our main objective is to help people securing food, this project stands as our immediate priority. The growing population in Indonesia and the world undeniably demands alternative food resources and that is the main reason why we put our focus in this project. KM9, however, is not meant to be a full scale plantation, it is merely a trial, pilot project that needs to be studied more extensively. Our foundation plans to facilitate further on this through collaborative research and development project and we also welcome any partnership that interests in more essential Indonesian crops such as rice (Oryza sativa), corn (Zea mays), and soya bean (Glycine max).

Paludiculture Project

Wetland Internationals describes Paludiculture as the cultivation of native wetland species that are adapted to wet conditions, and deliver economically valuable products and services. Paludiculture can deliver substantial co‐benefits by preserving and sequestering carbon, supporting climate change mitigation and adaptation activities, regulating water dynamics (flood control) and water quality (purification), and conserving and restoring peatlands’ typical flora and fauna.

FAO reported that there are 165 species which have been identified to be suitable for paludiculture development in Indonesia. Besides producing traditional agricultural commodities such as food, feed, fiber and fuel, these paludiculture-suitable species can also generate other raw materials for a variety of purposes, such as for energy, construction, and biochemical products/industrial biochemistry. Among them are sago (Metroxylon spp.) for the production of noodles, purun grass (Eleocharis dulcis) for basketry, tengkawang (Shorea spp.) which produces edible oil, jelutung (Dyera spp.) which produces natural rubber, and rattan (Calamus rotang) for basketry and furniture.

Our foundation has a great interest at contributing in this particular agricultural practice. We are willing to scale-up paludiculture by providing resources to conduct relevant collaborative researches on its socio-economic, environmental, and gender aspects as suggested by FAO. We strongly welcome any partnership from established organizations with experience in this field.


Aquaculture Project

As defined by NOAA Fisheries, aquaculture refers to the breeding, rearing, and harvesting of plants and animals in all types of water environments including ponds, rivers, lakes, and the ocean. Aquaculture produces food fish, sport fish, bait fish, ornamental fish, crustaceans, mollusks, algae, sea vegetables, and fish eggs.

Aquaculture also includes the production of seafood from hatchery fish and shellfish which are grown to market size in ponds, tanks, cages, or raceways. It also includes the production of ornamental fish for the aquarium trade, and growing plant species used in a range of food, pharmaceutical, nutritional, and biotechnology products.

Freshwater aquaculture produces species that are native to rivers, lakes, and streams and it takes place primarily in ponds and in on-land, artificial recirculating systems. Our foundation believes that all components of our comprehensive water management system can support the development of freshwater aquaculture farm in our project site. We actually already have had a snakehead fish farm in the waste water area of the plantation but it has been inactive. Thus, we welcome all possible partnership with expertise and experience in this field in order to create more well-studied and well-maintain aquaculture farms in our site.

Community Engagement Program

Social justice is one of the three sustainability pillars that our organization takes into account. It is one of the main aspects of our framework. We are committed to benefit the local people as much as possible through our work. Therefore, we aim to conduct a series of community development programs as one of our agenda. These programs are designed to be highly relevant with our main causes and we realize that we can never accomplish this mission alone. Our foundation welcomes any project proposal that will help us improving the capacity of the local people such as public lectures, focus group discussions, women and children empowering events, seminars, social media campaigns, training/coaching for local farmers, and other capacity and awareness building activities.

Ecotourism Program

According to the the International Ecotourism Society, reported that there are 165 species which have been identified to be suitable for paludiculture development in Indonesia. Besides producing traditional agricultural commodities such as food, feed, fiber and fuel, these paludiculture-suitable species can also generate other raw materials for a variety of purposes, such as for energy, construction, and biochemical products/industrial biochemistry. Among them are sago (Metroxylon spp.) for the production of noodles, purun grass (Eleocharis dulcis) for basketry, tengkawang (Shorea spp.) which produces edible oil, jelutung (Dyera spp.) which produces natural rubber, and rattan (Calamus rotang) for basketry and furniture.

This definition is totally in line with our mission and organizational values. We want to play our role at promoting environmental and cultural awareness and respect by delivering memorable, interpretative experiences to visitors that will help raising such a sensitivity toward the causes that we support.

We see this type of tourism not only as an educational tool for both the hosts and the visitors, but also as a way to benefit the economic development and political empowerment of the local communities.

Our foundation sees a big potential to develop our project site as an ecotourism destination. We plan to start this program by developing a beautification strategy in the near future. This strategy might include comprehensive planning of landscape improvement procedure, establishment of interactive visitor center building, series of tour guiding training, and development of other relevant infrastructures.

Establishment of Agricultural Research and Technology Implementation Center

This could be the most distant dream of our organization but it is certainly a big mission that drives us to put the maximum efforts in every single of our work scope. We believe that eventually we can build an incubator for agritech, social fintech, healthcare, and educational startup companies in our project site. We dare to aim to make it the national agricultural showcase where we can bring the outside experts to assist the development of local enterprises and a national research center for as many visiting scholars as possible.